It’s kimchi jjigae time!

…granted that doesn’t have as nice of a ring as ‘peanut butter and jelly time’, it is just as tasty.

To start, sorry for the late update, and for the lack of pictures.  I’m currently at my family’s farm and  forgot to bring my power cord for my laptop, so it is currently offline until I get back to the city.  Once I get back I’ll add in some lovely pictures.  On to the food!

image

My lovely supper…please don’t mind my snazzy green laptop!

So, for this recipe, I used the recipe on the Maangchi website, found here.  Because I also had time while my stew simmered, I also used her recipe for kongnamool banchan (sprout side dish).

Now, as per the norm, I did make some substitutions.  Instead of the pork belly, I took a suggestion from the comments and used boneless pork chops.  And for the kongnamool I used beans sprouts instead of the soybean variety she used (but according to the wizards on the interweb this dish can be made with any variety of bean-esque sprout).

For the kimchi jjigae I used my home made kimchi, white and green onions, sugar, gochujang (red pepper paste), and tofu (I omitted the red pepper flakes because there was enough of that in my kimchi already).  She also suggested using a can of tuna instead of pork (kimchi chamchi jjigae), but I will save that one for another day.

As I mentioned before, my kimchi is SPICY!!!  I probably could have omitted the gochujang, but it made the colour of the jjigae so pretty I couldn’t resist.  I also wish I would have rinsed my kimchi before placing in the pot to simmer, simply due to the overwhelming heat of it.  I have been trying for the last year to increase my spice tolerance, but this was still above my level.  To compensate, I added more water near the end of the cooking to mellow it out a bit.  In turn it turned out as more of a kimchi tang (soup) instead of a jjigae (stew).

To start, I stirfried my white onions followed by the pork at the bottom of my dutch oven.  Once it was finished, I added my kimchi, green onions, sugar, and gochujang.  Then I covered it all with water, put on the lid and set the timer for ten minutes and let it boil.

As it was cooking, I rinsed my beansprouts and added about 2cm of water to the pot and let them steam until done (~10 minutes).  Once they were done, I turned down the heat on my kimchi jjigae to low so that it could start to simmer.  After I drained the beansprouts, I put them in a bowl and added the necessary ingredients: diced garlic, sesame oil, and green onions (I left out the sesame seeds simply because I did not have any).

After I was finished with the beansprouts I checked on my jjigae.  It should take approximately half an hour (25-35 min).  I added a bit more sugar than the recipe called for to get the taste right, and tossed in my chopped up tofu (I used a whole package instead of half so it wouldn’t go to waste).  Let the stew simmer for another five minutes and it’s ready!

I was actually surprised by how easy it was to make kimchi jjigae!  (Pleasantly surprised if you will)  Once the kimchi was ripened enough ( you should try to use kimchi that is a bit more ripe for the recipe), it was all a simple matter of throwing everything into a pot and letting it cook.  I will definitely be making this again ^^

Till next time!

P.S. Visa Update:  Word to the wise…make sure you SIGN the application form from Sogang before you send off your application. If they had a embarrassed blushing emoticon, I would be inserting it here.  I couldn’t believe it when the consulate called me and let me know that I had forgotten to do that.  I had been just a touch too eager and forgot that step.  Thankfully there is enough time for another bout of mail-back-and-forth, but it’s still a frustrating step you could avoid.  Good luck!

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2 thoughts on “It’s kimchi jjigae time!

    • Thank you so much! 🙂 I’m glad you like it! I know!! What are the chances? I agree on the emergency trip! We haven’t seen each other in sooo long!! Let me know if you can make it up at all 🙂

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